Folded Cyanotype 115, 2021

Fritz Horstman

Folded Cyanotype 115, 2021
Cyanotype fluid on paper
12 x 16 in
$500
Unit price per

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Subjectivity and objectivity oscillate in interesting ways when one looks closely at the systems that make up our world. Aspects of nature that may at first appear fixed and unchanged by the human world take on fluid and fungible features when closely observed. What may seem to be highly personal can expand to something universal. This perceptual fluidity informs the formal, spatial, and environmental concerns that run through all of my Folded Cyanotypes. Attention to material and process is paramount.

Folded Cyanotypes is a series of two-dimensional objects, which carry the memory of light, three-dimensional space and manual manipulation, and which stem from an interest in natural structure. They are made by first folding paper by hand into an intricate pattern. After unfolding it, cyanotype photographic fluid is applied. Working in the dark to protect the light-sensitive material, the paper is refolded, then placed in natural light, and sometimes manipulated using mirrors and lenses. The paper is then rinsed in water, and pressed flat to dry. What was exposed to light in the process turns blue when developed, and what was not remains white, furthering the spatial complications by reversing lightness and darkness.

By conflating and overlapping the subjective and objective, form and void, flatness and three-dimensionality, nature and culture, my Folded Cyanotypes celebrate the potential of fluidity.

Fritz Horstman is a visual artist, curator, and educator who has exhibited his photos, drawings, sculptures, and installations in recent exhibitions across Europe and North America. Recent residencies include the Dessau Bauhaus, Shiro Oni in Onishi, Japan, and the Arctic Circle Residency. His sculptures are on permanent display in Ås, Norway and at the Dessau Bauhaus. Recent curatorial projects have been realized at the New Britain Museum of American Art, the Ely Center in New Haven, and at Ortega y Gasset Projects in Brooklyn. He is education director at the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. Horstman received his BA from Kenyon College and his MFA from Maryland Institute College of Art.